MLMC 2016 Program Committee

Claire Brown

Claire M. Brown
Assistant Professor, Department of Physiology; Director, Advanced BioImaging Facility (ABIF),
McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Dr. Brown's research focuses on the use of advanced biophysical light microscopy techniques to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control cell migration at the fundamental level and in the context of breast cancer invasion and metastasis. She also oversees the ABIF facility at McGill that annually trains and services over 200 researchers from over 60 different laboratories across Montreal. Dr. Brown is an expert in training and education and has designed and offered more than 60 introductory and advanced hands-on workshops in the last 8 years including the founding of the internationally recognized Montreal Light Microscopy Course (MLMC). She brings 20 years of experience in advanced light microscopy techniques including but not limited to live cell imaging, correlation microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), photobleaching techniques (FRAP), total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and image processing and analysis.

 

Lisa Cameron

Lisa Cameron
Director, Confocal and Light Microscopy Core Facility, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
(an affiliate of Harvard Medical School), Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Dr. Cameron started the Confocal and Light Microscopy Core facility at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in April 2008 and has been the director since then. Before arriving in Boston, she received microscopy training as a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of renowned cell biologist and microscopist Ted Salmon at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There she studied microtubule dynamics in mitosis performing high-resolution live-cell time lapse imaging using a combination of widefield fluorescence, spinning disk confocal, and photo-activation fluorescence microscopy. With over 20 years of light microscopy experience, she also has expertise in total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, laser scanning confocal, multi-photon microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), spectral imaging, image deconvolution, and image processing and analysis. She advises and teaches researchers and oversees light microscopy systems which are used by more than 50 research laboratories annually at the Institute, surrounding Boston hospitals and a few companies. She has trained more than 200 users on fundamental and advanced microscopy techniques and has taught confocal workshops in collaboration with the neighboring Harvard Nikon Imaging Center and been an instructor in the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Quantitative Imaging: Cell to Molecules course and the MLMC in 2012, 2014 and the Canadian Light Microscopy Course in 2015. In the fall of 2016, Dr. Cameron will assume the directorship of the Duke University and Medical Center Light Microscopy Core Facility.

 

Pina Colarusso

Pina Colarusso
Research Associate Professor, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology & Scientific Director, Live Cell Imaging Facility Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Dr. Pina Colarusso is the Scientific Director of the Live Cell Imaging Facility (LCI) at the University of Calgary. She leads a team of imaging specialists who provide a high level of support and collaboration with researchers relying on optical microscopy to visualize and investigate disease processes. As the LCI is part of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases, the research questions centre on disease processes in infection and immunity. Dr. Colarusso has experience in techniques such as wide-field, confocal microscopy (laser scanning, spinning disk), and multi photon microscopy as well as in various image analysis approaches. Dr. Colarusso also has a keen interest in microscopy education. In collaboration with colleagues at the University of Calgary, she has developed a series of experiential modules for both microscopy and image analysis in which biologists master concepts and skills that that are directly transferable to the laboratory.

 

James Jonkman

James Jonkman
Manager, Advanced Optical Microscopy Facility, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

James has developed and currently manages the largest microscopy facility in Canada. With over 30 instruments at 3 sites, he and his team at the Advanced Optical Microscopy Facility (AOMF) help more than 400 users per year with every manner of optical microscopy, from basic fluorescence and brightfield acquisition to advanced live-cell techniques such as FRAP, FRET, and 3D analysis. James is particularly passionate about teaching and training users. He has been running week-long optical microscopy courses in the AOMF for 12 years, has co-authored several book chapters and review articles, presented at numerous conferences and webinars, and has helped as an MLMC organizer and instructor in the past (2012). James is also the co-president of the Canadian Cytometry and Microscopy Association (CCMA).

 

Paul S. Maddox

Paul S. Maddox
Assistant Professor and William Burwell Harrison Fellow, Laboratory of Mitotic Mechanisms and Chromosome Dynamics, Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer, Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA

Paul Maddox completed his PhD under the mentorship of renowned cell biology microscopist E. D. Salmon at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As a graduate student, professor Maddox developed and applied high resolution imaging techniques to the study of mitotic spindle dynamics in various model systems ranging from budding yeast to vertebrate tissue culture cells. Paul went on to become the Fayez Sarafim Damon Runyon post-doctoral fellow in Arshad Desai's lab at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at UCSD. In Dr. Desai's lab, Dr. Maddox continued to study cell division and use live cell imaging techniques, applying his microscopy skills to imaging of C. elegans. He started his independent career at the IRIC on the campus of the University of Montreal where he continued the use of light microscopy to address dynamic problems in cell biology. His current research interests include using light microscopy to understand chromosome and microtubule dynamics. Dr. Maddox's experimental philosophy mandates using the light microscope to "see" results in the most quantitative manner possible. In 2013, Dr. Maddox relocated his research team to the Department of Biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he is Assistant Professor and William Burwell Harrison Fellow. Dr. Maddox has over 19 years of experience with light microscopy and has been an instructor in light microscopy courses around the world including Europe, South America, and at the Marine Biological Labs in Woods Hole, USA. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers in his career.

 

Thomas Stroh

Thomas Stroh
Director, MNI Microscopy Core Facility, Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Dr. Stroh is the founding Director of the Microscopy Core Facility of the Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI), which serves the advanced microscopy needs of more than 30 laboratories from within the MNI and throughout the Montreal region. He is also an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery of McGill University. The Stroh laboratory is interested in understanding the regulation of subcellular localization and intracellular trafficking of G protein-coupled receptors and in their regional distribution in the central nervous system with a particular focus on using a wide array of high resolution microscopic techniques to visualize receptors and their subcellular dynamics. Coming from this background, Dr. Stroh brings 20 years of experience in light and electron microscopic techniques such as (but not limited to) confocal microscopy, histochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, unbiased stereology and, most recently, super resolution microscopy to the course, in which he participated as an instructor for the first time in 2012.

 

 


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